Posts Tagged ‘Online Marketing’

Switchblade’s Marie Macaspac Honored to be a Presenter at ARF’s 9th Annual Business of Saving Lives Conference

January 31st, 2013
Tony LaRussa's ARF 9th Annual Business of Saving Lives Conference  is Sunday, March 23, 2013

Tony LaRussa's ARF 9th Annual Business of Saving Lives Conference is Sunday, March 23, 2013

Marie Macaspac, owner of Switchblade Creative Studios and founder of AnimalRescueMarketing.com is one of 10 speakers who will be participating in this year’s Tony LaRussa’s Animal Rescue Foundation (ARF) annual conference, The Business of Saving Lives.

Marie will be sharing the stage with ARF’s Marketing Manager, Sara Kersey, for the topic, “Social Media: Unleashed!“. The 90 minute session will cover not just how to use social media, but tips and tricks that may not necessarily be found in a “How to” manual or “Social Media for Dummies” book.

From mobile mavens to casual users, we all know social media is an important marketing tool for animal welfare groups. Social networking choices and platforms are endless…yet the time your staff and volunteers have is not. Are your important messages getting lost in a social media sea of posts, tweets, and pins? Do you see images online and wonder how they got 400 “Likes” in one day? In this upbeat session, we’ll reveal tricks for getting your content liked and shared widely (and your messages heard loud and clear!), and how to tailor content to your audience and get your animals the attention they deserve. If you have the basic know-how to navigate Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and other popular platforms, we’ll show you how to stand out and get noticed!

Marie is honored to be a part of this year’s list of presenters:

  • Elena Bicker, Executive Director, Tony La Russa’s Animal Rescue Foundation
  • Susan Furukawa, Program Director Community Outreach, ASPCA®
  • Cynthia L. Karsten, DVM, Shelter Medicine Resident, UC Davis Koret Shelter Medicine Program
  • Sara Kersey, Marketing Manager, Tony La Russa’s Animal Rescue Foundation
  • Bob Lukas, DVM, Sage Centers for Veterinary Specialty and Emergency Care
  • Marie Rochelle Macaspac, Marketing Director, Muttville Senior Dog Rescue and Founder, AnimalRescueMarketing.com
  • Rebecca Marsh, former Executive Director, Fix Our Ferals
  • Nancy McKenney, CEO, Marin Humane Society
  • Paul O’Grady, Partner, Armanino McKenna LLP
  • Betsy Saul, Founder, Petfinder.com

“I am so excited to share my expertise with my fellow animal rescue advocates,” says Marie. ” I am thrilled that this opportunity can additionally introduce new visitors to AnimalRescueMarketing.com.”

To register to attend this year’s conference, click here. It is sure to be a blast!

What is Considered a Professional Email Address? And Why Is It Important?

September 18th, 2012

professional email addressI’ve been asked several times why I highly recommend setting up your email address to match your business’s domain, i.e. if your business domain name is www.mybiz.com, your email address should be” myname@md311.phpwebhosting.commybiz.com”.  If you can afford to purchase your domain name, then please take the time to sign up for a free Google Apps account and set up professional email addresses for you and your employees. Using  professional email addresses to communicate with colleagues, clients, and display on business identity collateral is a very simple yet effective way to appear as a legitimate business that has longevity, stability, and perceived as a “real” business.

 

Surprisingly, there really aren’t many articles on the web that talk about what is professional email address is. I found one great resource that clearly explains how to identify professional email addresses on www.daniweb.com. The original post can be found here: http://www.daniweb.com/community-center/threads/218079/what-is-a-professional-email-address#

 

A professional e-mail address is defined as one that, in its entirety, represents and reflects the professional interests of the user or owner of the e-mail address itself. A professional e-mail address forms a constituent part of how individuals or organisations actively market their products, services, skills, or professional objectives. A professional e-mail address also therefore communicates factual, useful, and meaningful information about the owner or user of the address.

To determine whether an e-mail address is professional, ambiguous, or unprofessional, both parts of the address, i.e. the local element before the ‘@md311.phpwebhosting.com’ sign and the domain name that follows have to be considered. Furthermore both elements have to be judged singularly and jointly to determine whose interests the e-mail address best represents.

To clarify further it is worth looking at examples and classifying them accordingly. For the purpose of examination the examples are based on the premise that the owner is using the e-mail address in a professional context.

Examples and classification

john.doe@md311.phpwebhosting.comcompanyABC.com
Context: John Doe has a professional relationship with the domain name owner.
In this example the local element before the ‘@md311.phpwebhosting.com’ sign adopts a conventional, informative and factual format, and the domain name represents and promotes the interests of an entity that John Doe has a professional relationship with (namely companyABC).
Class: Professional.

sales@md311.phpwebhosting.comcompanyABC.com
Context: ‘sales’ has a professional relationship with the domain name owner.
In this example the local element before the ‘@md311.phpwebhosting.com’ sign adopts a conventional, informative and factual format, and the domain name represents and promotes the interests of an entity that ‘sales’ has a professional relationship with (i.e. companyABC).
Class: Professional.

jane.doe@md311.phpwebhosting.commortgagebrokers-sonline.com
Context: The domain owner has a professional relationship with Jane Doe and others who operate in the mortgage broker industry.
From Jane Doe’s perspective the domain name represents three separate entities: Jane herself, others that use mortgagebrokers-online to market their services, and the entity that operates mortgagebrokers-online itself. In this case separate parties are operating in consensus to share a domain name for mutual advantage The domain name identifies and communicates the industry that Jane is operating in, and the local element before the ‘@md311.phpwebhosting.com’ sign, (i.e. her name), is conventional, informative, and factual.
Class: Professional.

john.doe@md311.phpwebhosting.comit-consultant.com
Context: john.doe is an IT consultant but has no professional relationship with the domain owner.
In this example the local element before the ‘@md311.phpwebhosting.com’ sign is conventional, informative, and factual, and the domain name acts to identify and therefore market John Doe’s skills or services.
Class: Professional.

teddy.bears@md311.phpwebhosting.commyunusual-domain.com
Context: the term ‘teddy.bears’ has a professional relationship with myunusual-domain.com and is relevant to a service, product, or other element associated with the owners’ professional interests.
This e-mail address can initially appear to be unprofessional however the owner may be providing a niche service. From the owner’s perspective the entire e-mail address may accurately reflect their business interests in a meaningful and professional sense.
Class: Professional.

companyABC@md311.phpwebhosting.comyahoo.com
Context: companyABC and yahoo.com have no professional relationship.
In this example the elements before and after the ‘@md311.phpwebhosting.com’ sign adopt a conventional, informative and factual format. Use of this e-mail address virally markets the name of companyABC, however it also endorses the services of the webmail service / domain owner. CompanyABC is using an address that in its’ entirety, does not represent or promote its professional interests. Given the relative ease of acquiring a professional domain name, and the fact that companyABC is claiming an Internet presence, use of this email address is not considered professional.
Class: Ambiguous / unprofessional.

jane.doe@md311.phpwebhosting.comgmail.com
Context: jane.doe and gmail.com have no professional relationship.
As with the previous example this address acts to serve the interests of the domain owner / service provider. Whilst jane.doe has elected to use a standard format for the local element before the ‘@md311.phpwebhosting.com’ sign, the overall e-mail address does not actively market or promote her professional interests.
Class: Unprofessional.

johndoe.superguy06@md311.phpwebhosting.comhotmail.com
Context: johndoe.superguy06 and hotmail.com have no professional relationship. Assuming Johndoe has no professional interest associated with the term ‘superguy06’ this e-mail address does not actively promote or market johndoe in a professional context. Furthermore, the format used before the ‘@md311.phpwebhosting.com’ sign is, for argument purposes, neither factual nor informative and will not be respected professionally. The address does however actively promote the e-mail service provider. Johndoe has endorsed their service and is performing viral marketing on their behalf. From the service providers perspective their professional interests have been represented in a positive manner by the fact that Johndoe is using their product.
Class: Unprofessional.

Conclusion
In order for an e-mail address to be classified as professional, ambiguous, or unprofessional, it needs to be considered in context, format, and in terms of factual and informative content. The local and domain name elements of the address need to be considered in their relationship to each other, and the intended audience of the e-mail address needs to be understood.

Is Print Dead? Find out at Visual Media 2011

March 8th, 2011

Switchblade Creative Studios founder, Marie Macaspac,  will explore the topic of print and how it fits with today’s marketing strategies in a panel discussion at the Visual Media  2011 Conference on May 12, 2011 at the UCSF Mission Bay Conference Center.

Marie will be the Panel Moderator, delving into topics and questions that explore the fears and the successes of those who built their careers and businesses in the print and publishing world. Our esteemed Panel Speakers provide insight in how they survived the changes in the print industry and came out on top, but not without a few scrapes and bruises.

PANEL DISCUSSION:

Take Your Knowledge of Print Marketing to Online Mediums

For many years, being well versed in graphic design and marketing meant understanding the ins-and-outs of printing. Although those principles remain important, they keep close company with web design, social media, and email marketing. The list goes on with more to come. This session will explore the broad spectrum of industry professionals. They will discuss their challenges and successes, and how they made the transition from print-focused collateral to online mediums.

Panel Moderator:
Marie Rochelle Macaspac, Co-Founder / Creative Director of Switchblade Creative Studios

Panel Speakers:

Jane Goldman, Founder of  CHOW.com

Steve Decker, Founder of Zooka Creative

Jessica Greenwalt, Freelance Graphic Designer, www.jgreenwalt.com

Mark Rogers, Owner of Mark Rogers Photography

 

Interested in contributing to the discussion? Please send your questions, and we’ll consider them for our panel discussion.

Online Marketing & Social Media Campaign for The Scout Guide San Francisco

September 25th, 2010

The Scout Guide San Francisco

Client: The Scout Guide San Francisco

Challenge: Editor-In-Chief Paula Bennett launched the SF franchise of The Scout Guide”, a new high end promotional publication that showcases the city’s best  businesses. Each city managed a single blog section on the main website, and therefore each city had limited access to overall administrative areas of the website.

Switchblade Solution: Challenges often times lead to new and clever routes to achieve the end goals. We were right beside Paula as she launched the book and the website. Social media was in place to get the marketing machine rolling! The Scout Guide San Francisco hit the streets, both online and literally! We formulated a few new tactics to work around the obstacles, and we impressed ourselves with the flow of our innovative system to communicate and engage online.

Switchblade Featured in a Short Documentary, “Welcome to Muttville”

May 18th, 2010

If you know Switchblade, then you know that we are avid supporters of Muttville Senior Dog Rescue. If you visit the San Francisco office, there is always at least one Muttville foster dog hanging out with us.

Rachelle Phillips, a USF student studying media and film, created a wonderful short documentary that captures the essence of Muttville beautifully. Switchblade’s Marie Macaspac was interviewed as Muttville’s Online Marketing Director. Phillips premiered the film last Friday, May 14, to the public. Muttville will likely host a screening for its volunteers and supporters.

“My heart is in all the work we do for Muttville, ” said Marie. “We’ll always do anything we can to support this group and the work they do.”