Posts Tagged ‘LinkedIn’

Get These Phrases Out of Your LinkedIn Headline!!

April 10th, 2013

We got a great laugh with this article, originally published on Executive Resume Expert. We hope you get a good laugh – plus lots of great tips – from this article.
Originally published here: http://executiveresumeexpert.com/2013/03/06/worthless-phrases-in-linkedin-headline/

The 5 Most Worthless Phrases in Your LinkedIn Headline

LinkedIn HeadlineYour LinkedIn Headline is arguably the most important piece of real estate within your Profile.

Yet, most users remain confused about its true function, and what to use (in place of the default, which is your current job title).

Within LinkedIn’s search algorithm, your Headline ranks #1, meaning that out of all the other information you’ll add to your Profile, the words here are weighted more heavily as search terms.

In addition, your Headline is the first (and possibly the ONLY) piece of information other users will see. It’s displayed in a search list, under your name in an Invitation, and in numerous other prominent places on the site.

Here’s my list of the most meaningless words you can use in your Headline (all found in actual Profiles!) – plus some suggestions for stronger alternatives:

1 – “Top 1% (5%, etc.) Viewed Profile.”

Sure, this is an accomplishment… but not of any magnitude worth touting to employers.

Here’s why: if you’re an Operations Director, and put only these 2 words in  your Headline, plus the same title for your past 4 jobs and NO other information anywhere in your Profile, you’ll probably rank in the Top 1% for “Operations Director.”

In other words, reaching 1% this way would require hardly any effort.

However, if you’ve inserted 2,000 to 3,000 other words that describe your career level, achievements, and scope of authority, your Profile View ranking will take a dive due to reduced keyword density.

Still, you’ll be more findable on skills and other keywords (because recruiters often specify a mix of search terms when sourcing candidates)… and you’ll make a better impression on employers.

Therefore, an impressive Top Viewed ranking is just that – impressive, but not helpful in your search and not worth using precious, keyword-heavy real estate (even if you want a job writing LinkedIn Profiles!).

Disclaimer: I’m ranked among the Top 1% as well (but you won’t find it in my Headline).

2 – “Results-Driven.”

Just like on your resume, it’s important to use terms that distinguish you from the competition. This phrase and others like it (“dynamic” or “visionary,” anyone?) have become so embedded in boilerplate resume-speak, they’re essentially meaningless.

Plus, can you picture a recruiter using “Results-driven” as a search term? I didn’t think so.

Instead, consider adding a short phrase to your Headline that actually describes results, slipping in a keyword or two (“Marketing VP Improving Social Media Engagement”).

Even a short, powerful note on the ROI from your skills (“Sales Manager | #1 Revenue Record Across Americas”) can make a better impression.

3 – “Experienced.”

Unless you’re a student, this word doesn’t count for much in describing your career. Most professionals, by way of their job titles and career history, ARE “experienced” in their chosen fields, so you’re not laying claim to a unique skill.

Make your Headline more search-friendly by using a mixture of current and target job titles (“Senior Director, VP Sales”) to show your career goals, or a short description of your achievements (“12%+ Annual Sales Growth”).

Either way, showing your career aspirations or accomplishments will actually prove that you’re experienced and worthy of employer attention.

4 – “Father,” “Husband,” “Wife,” etc.

I’ll say it again – LinkedIn isn’t Facebook, and it certainly isn’t Twitter (where these types of mini-bios are common).

On LinkedIn, other users are most interested in your career level and ability to produce results in a professional environment. Leave the family references for a more personal venue.

5 – “Unemployed.”

If you’re not using your Headline to strengthen your brand message with keywords and job titles, you’re missing out on potential traffic and employer interest. “Unemployed” is hardly a search term, and it certainly doesn’t speak to your expertise.

(It might, however, convey desperation.)

Instead of wasting Headline space with it, try sending the same message while specifying what you offer employers (“IT Director Seeking Infrastructure, Operations, & Development Leadership Role”), while injecting strong keyword content.

As you can see, there’s many ways to capture and express value to an employer with your Headline.

Take a few minutes to add some creative phrasing and keyword content for better ROI from your Profile.

LinkedIn’s New “Endorse Me” & Meetup’s New “Good To See You” Features

October 16th, 2012

I hadn’t read anything about these new features coming soon on LinkedIn or Meetup, so when I started to see the subject line “So and So has endorsed you” and “Good to See You” pop up in my email inbox by the dozens, I was pleasantly surprised and also wondering, “How did I suddenly become so popular?”

LinkedIn’s Endorse Me: This seems to be a way for LinkedIn to become more “social”. Unlike the Recommendations tool, where an Account user is making a request to individuals of his or her choice, LinkedIn is popping windows up on your profile with your Contacts, posing the question, “Would you endorse ‘so-and-so’ in..” with a specific job skill. At first, it appears like LinkedIn is just asking you a question, but in fact, you are about to communicate with someone that perhaps you haven’t communicated to in months or years! What do we think of this new feature? For us, we’d like a few months to see how it works into people’s everyday habits.

Meetup’s “Good To See you”: At first I thought it was a genuine effort by one of the members of my Photoshop Users Group! We had just concluded our monthly meeting, and it seemed like a thoughtful gesture. I was tricked! I started to get a handful at once with the same subject line!

Again, Meetup feels a need to get their usets to be more “social”. Is this one working? I thought it was pretty cool. Without really making any effort, I just said thanks to 20 attendees for joining us for the last users group meeting. Impersonal with a personal touch. What do you think of this new feature? Will it last beyond 2012? Or get old before Christmas?

Let us know what you think of these 2 new features. How can it help you as an employee, business owner, group leader, or member? Any ideas for making them work better? Or should we all just stick to Facebook?